women's health and fitness

The Five Ws of Women Walking, Part II

In Part I of this blog series, The Five Ws of Women Walking, I shared WHY women have to walk. (WHY tidily encompasses WHEN and WHERE, illustrating the multi-tasking magic inherent in walking.) In today’s post I’m going to share WHO walking is for. To cut to the chase: EVERY WOMAN!

Walking is for every woman!

Having said that, here’s some questions for you:

  • Have you ever said, “I want to workout but I don’t have the time”?

  • Have you ever confessed that you actually hate they gym?

  • Have you ever despaired that you’ll never find a workout that works for you?

  • Have you tried yoga, Pilates, hot boxing, etc all to no avail?

  • Do you feel guilty and ashamed that you aren’t getting the workout you want and need?

  • Do you sit at work all day?

  • Do you feel lethargic, depressed, brain-fogged?

  • Does your body ache?

  • Has your doctor prescribed walking?

  • Is every day of your life packed full to the point of bursting?

  • Do you yearn for a break from it all?

If you answered YES to any of these questions, then walking is for you.

Walking solves all these problems, obstacles, challenges and more!

I can hear you now saying, “Oh I know I should walk but . . .

My rebuttal is, “But what?”

  • But walking isn’t real exercise?

  • But walking isn’t enough?

  • But, you’re thinking, “I hate walking”?

  • But walking is boring?

I hear you still but no worries! In next week’s post, where I wrap up this series, I’ll address your “buts” by sharing WHAT walking really is. (And I’m throwing in a bonus HOW.)

In the meantime, sign up for the 1MWW newsletter, This Beautiful Walk, to stay updated on walking tips (for instance, a recent study showed walking backward improved short-term memory; I cannot make this stuff up), my own walking thoughts (walking increases creativity by 60%—it'‘s my moving muse), and news from the One Million Women Walking movement (how your $1/month membership is powerful beyond measure!)

Wondering Where I've Been? Well . . .

It’s like this: I’ve been gone for the past months due to mold poisoning.

The good news is that I am detoxing successfully and recovering. I cannot fully express how profoundly grateful I am to share that good news.

These months have been terrifying, confusing, frustrating beyond words and extremely humbling. I found myself disabled by a silent, invisible enemy that had the audacity to maliciously invade my body and brain and wreak havoc. The worst of it has been the impairment of cognitive function. That’s a fancy way of saying I couldn’t think or remember or strategize to save my soul--thus the terror.

Blessedly for me I have a phenomenally supportive family who circled around me with some really good group decision making, much needed resources, and endless amounts of patience. Thanks to them I got to my sister’s home in Florida where I have been detoxing and recovering.

Recovery has been slow, with a few setbacks. The setbacks are almost always brought about by my impatience with the process and my frustrations at not being able to do what I used to do. It won’t surprise you to know that when I hit a setback, I go for a walk. I walk a lot. In fact walking is once again saving my life--literally.

I’m also following a detox protocol with doses of activated coconut charcoal, which bind with the mold mycotoxins and remove them. I’m taking very high quality supplements to support the process. I walk, I eat live foods, I drink at least a gallon of water a day, I meditate, I swim, I sleep as much as I can. And I’m healing.

Recovery time from mold poisoning can be anywhere from 6 months to a year or more. (I’ll keep you posted.) For now what I want you to take away from this post is this: if you suspect there is mold where you live or work, do something about it. If you suspect you have mold poisoning, get help now.

I am not an expert on the subject matter, just a woman deep in detox and recovery. That being said, here’s two excellent resources where you can learn more. I highly recommend that you do:

Dr Ann Shippy, MD. Check out her “Could It Be Mold?” Fact sheet and her book, Mold Toxicity Workbook.

Dr Mark Hyman, MD’s Broken Brain Podcast with Dr. Shippy: Is Toxic Mold Causing Your Symptoms?

I’m on my way back now, I’m working a bit again, the 1MWW movement is growing, and I’m grateful. That’s where I am now. Next week I’ll be back to talking my walk! In the meantime, please take a moment to sign up for our newsletter.

This Beautiful Walk, the 1MWW newsletter will arrive in your inbox twice a month filled with walking news, walking inspiration, and most likely some of my truly awful puns. I’ll see you there!

Your Opinion Please!

One of the most entertaining activities on the 1MWW public Facebook page is voting for the cover for the upcoming month. I create at least two potential Facebook page covers and ask fans to vote for their favorite.

The photos I use are ones I’ve taken in years past, but they all correspond with the month they represent. I decided to broaden the monthly decision making by posting the choices here as well. Once you’ve chosen your favorite, jump on over to 1MWW on Facebook and vote. And while you’re there, LIKE our page!

Here’s the two contenders for March, 2019. The first is a photo I took in March, 2014 of a late snow, which stunned just about everyone, including this redbud tree. The second photo was taken in March, 2013 on a Sunday drive through the country south of Nashville. In a beautiful twist of fate, this same drive with this view is one I take frequently as my horse is boarded at a barn just down the road.

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There’s the back story on these two photos—the rest is up to you! Thanks for voting.

Walking Women: Peggy Hubbard!

Today’s Walking Women interview is with Peggy Hubbard of Lewisburg, Tennessee.

Q. Peggy, what inspired you to start walking?

A. Several years ago I was working a full time job and caring for a disabled husband. Each day melted into the next and I was losing my identity to my roles in life: business owner, caregiver, volunteer. One way to squeeze out some private time was to wake very early before the day’s caregiving duties began. One morning the sun was out and spring had arrived to Middle Tennessee. So, I leashed my beloved dog, Pepper, and we took off walking up a country road that led to our home. I discovered sights, smells and sounds I had not noticed from the car. I knew I had to give myself this gift over and over again. A habit was born! 

Q. How long have you been walking?

A. I’ve walked/hiked consistently for 6 years.

Q. What changes have resulted from walking?

A. Naturally my body changed as my legs and lungs became stronger. My soul opened to the joy of a sunrise, the smells of fresh hay, and the sounds of nature waking for a new day. I found joy in the baby goats at a nearby farm and took time to stop and watch their prancing and playing. I happily waited for the neighbor’s horse to exit the barn and head to the fence to greet Pepper with a quick snort. So, patience, a badly needed trait, was gained. The sound of my feet and Pepper’s paws hitting the ground became nearly hypnotic as I thanked God for all His goodness and grace.  

Q. What happens if you don’t walk?

A. Recently having a hip replacement has helped me understand how central walking is to my life. After a couple of weeks of being unable to move much I became stiff and unable to sleep well. Now that I can once again walk I’m limber, feel stronger and sleeping better. Mentally I find that walking keeps me grounded and causes me to take the time to practice gratitude which keeps me in tune with my blessings - which are many.  

“This photo is from Henry Horton Park. I love the walking trail there and love that this hollow tree looks like a heart...heart healthy walk!” ~ Peggy Hubbard

“This photo is from Henry Horton Park. I love the walking trail there and love that this hollow tree looks like a heart...heart healthy walk!” ~ Peggy Hubbard

Q. What does walking mean to you?

A. Walking is so much more than getting from one place to another.  It’s the opportunity to take in nature.  It’s the opportunity to find the path less traveled and saunter down while taking in the delicious sights, smells and sounds.

Q. What are your biggest walking challenges/obstacles?

A. Like most people, time and weather are often challenges. But now that I get the senior discount at our well equipped Rec Center I have many options for rainy day walking and the hours give me a safe place to walk after dark. Sometimes my heart wants to tackle trails longer and steeper than my body desires! 

Q. What advice would you give to women who know they should be walking but aren’t - yet?

A. Take it one block at a time. Start by perhaps thinking of things that bring your life joy and voice gratitude for them. Use the time to experience your own breath, the feel of your body moving and the sounds of your feet connecting with Earth.

Peggy, thank you so very much for sharing your walking story with us. You’re an inspiration in every way!

Peggy Hubbard is a State Farm Insurance Agent.  She maintains an office in Lewisburg, TN and conducts business throughout the state. She is also an adjunct instructor of Criminal Justice at Columbia State Community College, a Rotarian currently serving as an Assistant District Governor, a volunteer for several charitable organizations, a lover of nature, and a member of One Million Women Walking!

Peggy is married to the marvelous Paul Kingsbury who is her frequent hiking partner, travel companion and all-around best friend. They have two adored kitty cats, Libby and Lizzy. Peggy loves music of all kinds, reading both fiction and non-fiction, and exploring nature.  

Peggy’s passion is using her skills and talents to help others be their very best. She loves to be surrounded by positive, happy friends and believes in a hands-on approach to charitable work.